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Showing posts tagged with: elderly care

Care costs to be capped for elderly

Pensioners who face selling their homes to pay for long-term care will be offered state protection for the first time under government plans to be outlined next week.

Ministers are expected to put on record their commitment to the principle of   introducing a “cap” on the amount individuals pay for care during their lives to prevent costs reaching “catastrophic” levels.

However, the Coalition will risk angering charities and campaigners by deferring for at least a year a decision on how to pay for the reforms.

Pensioners will almost certainly see no benefit before the next general election.

The plan, contained in a “progress report” on social care funding, is expected to be published on Wednesday alongside a White Paper outlining major reforms to services for disabled and elderly adults in England.

David Cameron and Nick Clegg will review the detail of the proposals before they are put to the Cabinet next week. Family members who care for frail relatives will be given legal rights to support from councils for the first time.

Andrew Healing of Routes Healthcare commented ..."The Government raids the savings of those who have been careful and cautious and paid their taxes and NI throughout their working lives, then expects them to raid their bank accounts and sell their properties – we either provide healthcare or we don’t.  I am sure that everybody would welcome a shake-up of the current system and I for one, will be waiting for the White Paper to be published later this week."

For the full article see this weekend's Daily Telegraph at http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/9382983/Care-costs-to-be-capped-for-elderly.html

Posted by: Andrew Healing on July 8th, 2012 @ 8:46 PM

Carers of young and old 'are struggling to cope'

The pressure of looking after children while caring for elderly relatives is taking its toll on all aspects of family life, a Carers UK survey suggests.

It found that a third of "sandwich carers" had to give up work, while two-thirds said their marriages had been damaged.

The charity is calling for care services and employers to support the 2.4 million families in this situation.

Three-quarters of those surveyed said they had suffered a loss of earnings, and 95% said the pressure of caring had affected their ability to work.

When asked about family finances, 52% said the cost of caring for elderly relatives was having an impact while 50% reported they were struggling with childcare costs.

The responsibilities of caring for young and old can be detrimental to family life too, the survey suggests, with two-thirds of sandwich carers reporting damage to their marriages or personal relationships.

View the original article here.

Posted by: on November 30th, 2012 @ 09:24 AM

The consequences of a busy day

Cast your mind back to 27 February. It was a Monday morning. The weather was pretty mild for the end of winter.

The day before Liverpool had won the Carling Cup football final, while the Sun on Sunday had just been launched.

For the NHS, it was to be the busiest day of the year.

The bed occupancy rate nationally was 92% - seven percentage points above the recognised safe level - according to an analysis by monitoring body Dr Foster.

Nearly half of the 145 trusts in England reported a bed occupancy rate of 95% or above.

There is nothing to suggest anything specific went wrong that day.

But what is certain is that staff working on the wards of hospitals up and down the country would have been struggling to keep up.

Quality of care

When bed occupancy tips the 85% mark the system goes into overdrive - and things start to give.

For patients that means quality of care may suffer.

They may have to wait that little bit longer before their call bell is answered. There may not be enough staff to help the frail at meal times.

Discharge planning can go awry as hospitals become desperate to free up beds. That can mean they turf people out before they are ready or before the support in the community from district nursing teams and social care is in place.

Because of the shortage of beds, patients can find themselves moved around from ward to ward, inevitably finding themselves in unsuitable surroundings.

On their own, these things seem relatively minor, but added together they create the sort of care that leaves people feeling aggrieved and which, at its worse, is unsafe.

For the full article click here.

Posted by: on December 3rd, 2012 @ 12:05 AM

Merge NHS and social care, says Labour

The NHS and social care budgets in England should be combined to create a super pot to meet the needs of the ageing population, Labour says.

The money - worth £119bn this year - could be used to provide more joined-up care across the hospital, mental health and care sectors, the party believes.

In a speech on Thursday, shadow health secretary Andy Burnham will say the current arrangements are outdated.

He will claim "dangerous" gaps between services put the vulnerable at risk.

The proposal could see councils get much more involved in making decisions about the NHS, while the biggest hospitals may end up expanding into the community, perhaps even running care homes.

To read the full article click here.

Posted by: on January 24th, 2013 @ 10:03 AM

App to tackle loneliness wins social care Dragons' Den contest

An app that helps families separated by geography stay in touch with loved-ones at risk of loneliness triumphed in a recent Dragons' Den-style contest to identify innovative solutions to adult social care's funding crises.

The Mindings system enables people to send texts, emails, pictures and social media messages to a digital screen in the home of a loved-one so they can stay in touch. It is targeted at families where there is a relative who does not use mobile phones or social media themselves.
In the competition run by East of England local government efficiency body Improvement East, it beat off competition from, among others, Just Checking, a system that enables families and professionals to monitor service users in their own homes through wireless sensors.
 
The "dragons" - in this case a group of health and social care leaders - said they thought Mindings was a "powerful tool in addressing loneliness". More information is available on the Mindings website.
Posted by: Andrew Healing on January 30th, 2013 @ 11:12 AM

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