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Showing posts tagged with: immune system

Cancer 'Smart Bomb' Successfully Tested in US

Scientists have successfully tested a capillary "smart bomb" that simultaneously attacks cancer and boosts the immune system.

The tiny hollow spheres become trapped in leaky tumour blood vessels, where they unleash an anti-cancer drug.

At the same time the spheres, called nanolipogels (NLGs), release a protein that rallies the body's own defences.

Researchers tested the spheres in mice on melanoma skin cancer that had spread to the lungs.

Tumour growth was significantly delayed and the survival of the mice increased.

The new technology overcomes a problem with cancer treatment that has been difficult to tackle using conventional therapies, say the scientists.

Cancer tumours are known to secrete chemicals that confuse the immune system.

But attempts to boost patient immunity while at the same time neutralising the cancer's chemical arsenal rarely work.

The NLGs, described in the journal Nature Materials, package together two completely different kinds of molecule.

One is designed to overcome a potent cancer defence weapon called TGF-beta, which stunts the local immune system.

The other, an interleukin signalling molecule, boosts immune system activity.

Researcher Dr Stephen Wrzesinski, from Yale University School of Medicine in the US, said: "One problem with current metastatic (spreading) melanoma immunotherapies is the difficulty managing autoimmune toxicities when the treatment agents are administered throughout the body.

"The novel nanolipogel delivery system we used will hopefully bypass systemic toxicities while providing support to enable the body to fight off the tumour at the tumour bed itself."

Each NLG is small enough to travel through the bloodstream, but large enough to get entrapped in leaky cancer blood vessels. Once trapped, they biodegrade to release their cargo.

Article taken from Sky News - click here to view.

Posted by: on July 16th, 2012 @ 12:52 AM

How to beat a cold in just 24 hours

When the dreaded  lurgy strikes, a day in bed can seem like the only option. But with Christmas just  around the corner, few of us have the time - or inclination - to put up with a  hacking cough or aching muscles for long.

Now, help is at  hand from a leading expert. Here, Professor Ron Eccles from the Common Cold  Centre at Cardiff University tells MailOnline how to beat the bug in just one  day...

To read the full article click here.

Posted by: on December 18th, 2012 @ 10:39 AM

Winter bug cases '83% up on 2011'

Latest figures show there has been an increase in cases of norovirus - often known as the winter vomiting bug.

The Health Protection Agency estimates there have been about 880,000 cases in England and Wales since the summer, 83% more than in the same period last year.

There have been just over 3,000 lab-confirmed cases.

But the HPA says these reported cases are the tip of the iceberg and for each one, there will be around 288 that go unreported.

To read the full article click here.

Posted by: on December 19th, 2012 @ 11:42 AM

Breast cancer drug tamoxifen recommended for 'high risk' women

Women in England and Wales with a strong family history of breast cancer could be offered medication on the NHS to try to prevent the disease.

The National Institute of Health and Clinical Excellence has launched a consultation on whether tamoxifen could be given for up to five years.

If approved later this year, the draft guidelines would be the first of their kind in the UK.

Charity Breakthrough Breast Cancer welcomed the "exciting, historic step".

To read the full article click here.

Posted by: on January 15th, 2013 @ 12:27 AM

Fresh hope for cancer sufferers as Manchester scientists make new breakthrough

Scientists have made a breakthrough in understanding what causes an aggressive form of blood cancer.

Experts at Cancer Research UK’s Paterson Institute at the University of Manchester have found that a protein, known as TTC5, is crucial to fuelling acute myeloid leukaemia.

They discovered that reducing the amount of the protein in cells causes the leukaemia to die.

The researchers, led by James Lynch from the Paterson, say that the study gives a greater understanding of the proteins that cancers need to grow and could help in the development of more targeted drugs in the future.

To read the full article, please click here.

Posted by: on April 17th, 2013 @ 11:59 AM

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